Culinary Exploration

Posted in Guest Authors, Serene Recipes , on August 17, 2010 , Leave a Comment

One of Wy’s wyldest courtiers, The Marquize Wantonne, is known as writer Anne Souter in the wider world.  Here, The Marquize  explores the relationship between Food and Art.

THE ART OF DINING

When you dine it is of utmost importance to create the most flamboyant sense of theatre possible.  A gold and silver candelabrum with crystal decanters will help you set the scene and mood and the aura you project should be one of seductive sophistication. Apart from a sense of drama in the décor, careful attention to your guest list is essential in order to avoid non-riveting dinner conversation.  It is also crucial that you counter-balance natural listeners and natural talkers, so always try to seat a  quiet person next to a talker.

Right now, in October 2010, we in Wy are experiencing the same weird weather as those of you in the wider world – freezing cold one minute and sunny and hot enough to grow tropical fruit the next. To reflect this interesting phenomenon, here is a recipe from a glorious new cookbook, on which I, Wantonne, am currently collaborating with Prince Paul.   In our book,  Food is Art!

 MANGO TROUT ANTARCTICA ©

Twirls of trout on swirls of mango borne on wyte-green wafer pikelets

This recipe is dedicated to all the heroic Australians, including Sir Douglas Mawson, who explored The Antarctic. How they would have dreamed of having such a delicacy served up to them in the frozen wastelands to our south!

 2 large brown-shell free-range eggs*

1/4 cup very, very finely chopped fresh dill (to taste)

1½ cups milk

1 cup self-raising flour

1 tablespoon vegetable oil

350g biodynamic yoghurt

150g smoked trout

1 large mango, mashed

1 lime, thinly sliced

To make the pikelets, break the eggs into a bowl, add half the dill and whisk with a fork.  Whisk in half a cup of milk, then a third of the flour, and another half cup of milk and whisk.  Whisk in the remaining milk, flour and dill until smooth in consistency.

Heat half the oil in a large non-stick pan and drop two large serving spoons full of pikelet mix into pan, far enough away from each other to spread and cook separately.  Lightly brown the pikelets until small bubbles appear on top.  Turn and lightly brown on the other side.  Transfer direct to small plates and repeat this procedure three more times, adding the rest of the oil to the pan once you have made the first four pikelets.

Serve while still warm, topped with swirls of mango and twirls of smoked trout, surrounded by swirls of yoghurt to resemble snow.  Serve with lime slices.

Serves 8  

* protected penguin eggs are not acceptable